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    Our shared values in Y5: To care for myself and others by making sure we are all safe and happy. To be honest in all we do/say. We always work hard and try our best. We listen carefully and thoroughly. We make sure we are always giving our best, so everyone else can be the best that they can be. We look after our property.
    We like to be 'leaders' and not 'followers' We always choose the 'good' light inside of us. We make the right choices at the right time.




    Anyone can train hard for a short period. Winners give their best every hour of every day for months on end.



    In 5V we like to stop and think - before we do or speak.

    'Give children a thought and they’ll learn for a day. Teach them to think and they’ll learn for a lifetime.’David Hyerle
    If you can imagine it, you can achieve it; if you can dream it, you can become it.- William Arthur Ward
    You cannot write it, if you cannot say it; you cannot say it, if you haven't heard it. - Pie Corbett

    We love to share our way of thinking, it does help us in our learning!

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    Note for Parents on the Parents Page


    Image:victoriaspast



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  • We do like to learn!

    Rivers- Geography Topic
    The Titanic - 2012 - 100 years!

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    Queen Victoria: Reigned: 1837-1901 [63 years and 7 months]

Vile Victorians!

They were vile,
They were vile,
They were absolutely vile,
The Victorians were absolutely vile.

They had some different style,
and thought of names such as Kyle,
The Victorians were absolutely vile.

They invented lots of things,
Like gold and diamond rings,
The Victorians were absolutely vile.

Some were rich and some were poor,
and some earned shillings by cleaning the floor,
The Victorians were absolutely vile.

Then the Queen Died,
Everybody cried,
The Victorians were absolutely vile!
-Harnoor


image: BBC
Poisoned

The greatest Victorian serial killer wasn’t Jack the Ripper, as you may think. It was a woman! In 1873, in County Durham, Mrs Mary Ann Cotton was accused of poisoning her step-son, the eight year old Charles Edward. A doctor looked at the contents of the stomach and said, ‘The boy died of gastric fever’. Mary Ann Cotton was free to go.

But the next day, a local newspaper pointed out that a lot of Mary Ann’s children and husbands had died of ‘gastric fever’. Too many to be a coincidence? The body of Charles Edward was dug up and tested for arsenic poison. It was full of it. So were some of her previous victims. Mary Ann Cotton was hanged and it was believed she had murdered three husbands and 15 of her children! Mary Ann is forgotten while Jack the Ripper, who killed half the number of victims, is remembered. Strange. See this link [and the history page of the blog] for more Victorian facts: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/deary_gallery_05.shtml



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